Writing: Resources & the Road Forward

First things first: an ENORMOUS (terribly belated!) thank you to everyone who voted in my poll on Twitter-style novel pitches. With your help, I went into #PitMad with enthusiasm–and I’m thrilled to report, not without result. By the close of December 1, my pitches for my 1920s historical novel had received a total of four likes–two by literary agencies, and two by independent publishing companies. I’ve since fired off all requested queries, synopses, and reading samples. Thus far, one entity has requested a full manuscript. Hooray! One entity has given the project a pass. Awww…. (This is an excellent example of how peculiar art businesses like writing are–what prompts one person to seek more will be un-alluring to the next.) Where things go from here, literally only God knows. But it’s encouraging when people out in the mystical realm of publication evidence interest in  your ideas. And despite my temptation to be discouraged by one person’s “no,” I’m also in wholehearted concurrence with The Baffled King blog: when someone requests a full manuscript after reading your sample pages, it’s essential to make a moment to celebrate that victory, even if no contract follows after. Little victories are victories nonetheless.

Baby steps, right? Continue reading “Writing: Resources & the Road Forward”

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Help me, Dear Reader. You’re my Only Hope….

A writer’s best friends are her readers and her writing community. Thus, à la Princess Leia, I’m not too proud to ask for a bit of help now and again.

Frequently, I find myself amazed by the speed with which the writing world changes. When I first ventured into publishing, eBooks were a twinkle in someone’s eye. Self-publishing meant arranging for a vanity press to print (for a fee) hard and paperback copies of your book. The standard method for seeking publication was for an author to directly submit her manuscript to a publishing house. Literary agents were a nice-to-have, rather than the (with rare exception) must-have they are today if you’re pursuing traditional publication.

In little more than a decade, all this has changed.

Now it’s almost unheard of for an author to pitch his or her own “unsolicited” manuscript directly to a publishing house. Today, common practice means landing an agent who then uses her institutional knowledge and professional credibility to act as an intermediary, approaching publishers on her author’s behalf. Continue reading “Help me, Dear Reader. You’re my Only Hope….”