Five Magical Realism Novels to Snag this Summer

I may have stumbled onto Magical Realism at some earlier point in my reading life, but the first book I can remember reading from this genre is Sarah Addison Allen’s Garden Spells. As a psuedo-Southern girl–Texas falls on that fine line between the Deep South and the Southwest–I couldn’t resist the charm of the novel’s Southern setting and atmosphere. But what really captured me was the book’s unique style, the way elements of magic enlivened the otherwise realistic story in surprising ways. At that point, I didn’t have the literary term “Magical Realism” at hand. But this striking balance between the realistic and the magical kept me buying literally every book Allen has written since.

As you might guess, Magical Realism is something of a sister genre to Fantasy, sharing as they do a theme of, well, fantasy, But unlike Fantasy novels, whose magic occurs in unique worlds carefully invented by the author, Magical Realism novels have magic sprinkled throughout our own world, realistically-rendered. Compare, for instance, J. R. R. Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings and Joanne Harris’s Chocolat.  Continue reading “Five Magical Realism Novels to Snag this Summer”

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The Style & Times of Alice Hoffman

By sheer accident, I wound up reading two of Alice Hoffman’s novels simultaneously: Practical Magic, from the earlier half of her canon, and The Museum of Extraordinary Things, her most recent novel until The Marriage of Opposites‘ publication just this August.

This reading coincidence was by no means deliberate. Rather, it was born of two quirks of mine.

No. 1–I’m nearly always reading 2-3 books at any given time. I’ve been doing this since I was a wee lil’ reader. I think it comes from wanting to have a book pre-positioned in any room I might enter. That way, in true lazy American fashion, I can plop into a seat with whatever volume happens to be nearest. Continue reading “The Style & Times of Alice Hoffman”